The power of the geothermal dimension of the Iceland experience – By Mike Klein

While Iceland is best known for its volcanic landscape and it’s lively little capital of Reykjavik, the crown jewel of the Iceland experience is the “pot” – a place to bathe in warming geothermal waters, outdoors and 52 weeks a year.

No, not that kind of “pot” – I speak of the kind that produces steam, not smoke.

Now, Iceland’s most famous geothermal sites, the Blue Lagoon near the capital and the Mývatn Nature Baths in the country’s North, are far larger than the average pot, the pot brings that warming sensation to hundreds of hotels, summer houses, and community pools around the country.

Geothermal winter afternoon
Experiencing the sunset, in the snow in a warm geothermal pot with a glass of something sparkling, is an unforgettable experience. Photo by Helga Stína

Summer houses often offer private pots for the use of their guests, making them instantly attractive on a year-round basis to those seeking the chance to see the northern lights while partially submerged with a glass of wine in hand.

A pot transforms a country hotel from a mere place to stay to a place to relax, and potentially, to meet other guests and trade travel experience stories.

Iceland’s dozens of community swimming pools usually have several pots, offering a variety of temperatures and occasionally, some form of water massage.

Invariably, the water is geothermally heated, so the experience is as “green” as it is warm. In areas where geothermal water is available, the water comes in straight from the earth. Otherwise, it is heated by Iceland’s extensive supply of geothermally-fueled electricity.

Hotels with access to pots also vary widely in price. Depending on the part of the country one is visiting, a summer house with a pot can start in price from $200 or €170, per night. Hotels with access to pots also vary widely in price. Community pools offer admission for less than $12 or €10, and a ticket to the Blue Lagoon will run you about $70 or €58.

Geothermal area and steaming fumaroles, Iceland
The smell in the geothermal areas of Iceland is the smell of home… for some people at least – Photo by Helga Stina

Mike Klein is Principal of Changing The Terms, a Reykjavik-based business communication consultancy.  A US native, Mike has lived in Iceland since 2020 and has also resided in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK.  He is the former Europe – Middle East – Africa chair of IABC, a leading global communication association.  He is particularly fond of Icelandic cod and the Gull brand of Icelandic lager, and is married to Helga Stina, founder of Iceland Unwrapped.

To arrange your Iceland holiday this year, visit @Iceland Unwrapped at www.icelandunwrapped.com