Highlands adventure – By Arjan van der Weck

I have to admit, I didn’t share my true objectives with my travel companions until after we rented the Landrover. Contemplating the costly consequences of damaging an almost new but uninsured car during a river crossing is an effective way of killing any adventure in the making. And an adventure was what I was after.

It was the same dedication that didn’t make us stop for long at the warning sign at the beginning of route F88 to the Askja crater, telling us not to continue without proper preparation, experience and gear.

‘Áfram bara!’ we said to each other, the Icelandic version of ‘Let’s go!’.

Photo by Arjan van der Weck

 

And the road turned out to be challenging indeed. We were driving for hours through the lunar landscape of the highlands, crossing rivers with the car we would never consider wading through.

There is video footage of our first river crossing, in which you can hear me giving instructions to myself on how to handle the car while trying to radiate confidence to my passengers – obviously in vain. Every now and then we were overtaken by faster and bigger cars that were ferrying tourists up and down from Akureyri in one day trips. With a nervous grin on my face, I assured my travel companions our self-drive adventure was the better option.

The stops were as welcome as magnificent. Herðubreiðarlindir, Herðubreið herself, Askja and Öskjuvatn exceeded expectations, already raised to astronomic levels by pictures and travel guides.

Photo by Arjan van der Weck

 

But the best was yet to come. As often, the highlights of the trip aren’t the ones predicted in the travel guides. From a chat with one of the rangers of the Vatnajökull National Park, we learned there was a recently risen opportunity to take a natural hot bath in one of the upstream branches of the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river. Following an unmarked track, she was happy to point out to us, we arrived at a recent extension of the Holuhraun lava field.

None of us is ever going to forget the experience: being absolutely alone in the middle of the highland wilderness, swimming in a warm glacial river next to a steaming lava field at arm’s length of the Vatnajökull ice cap truly was the highlight of the holiday.

Photo by Arjan van der Weck

Unfortunately, some of us weren’t fully prepared for everything. While most of us packed their swimming suits in the morning, some didn’t. Which wasn’t much of a problem while being amongst ourselves.

But when the local rescue team on duty showed up at the site after an hour, the situation turned mildly awkward. Keeping cool already was the theme of the day but doing so when climbing out of a river without swimming trunks under the watchful eyes of six Vikings wearing survival suits and sunglasses is something else.

Fortunately, they planned to do the same as we did, and fortunately some of them were as ill prepared as we were. Shared awkwardness turned into a funny situation.

Never forget to bring your swimming suit regardless where you are going is a lesson not to be learned often enough in Iceland.

Photo by Sara Lind

 

And so, we found ourselves at a distance of more than 150 kilometers away from the nearest paved road early in the evening. It wasn’t going to be dark anytime soon, but we still had to travel quite a distance before we finally reached the Möðrudalur skáli just before closing time.

Our dinner of sandwiches, hot dogs and soda could not have tasted better…

Arjan van der Weck is a geographer, specializing in international projects. He is based in Delft, The Netherlands and his wife Hanna Lára is Icelandic.

More on personalized travel planning on the website of Iceland Unwrapped by helgastina

The Feeling of Iceland – By Helga Stína

Iceland is again on the top of many people´s list to travel in the post-pandemic era.

My clients have been looking forward to traveling for a long time, and are eager to explore the beauty of Iceland.

The feeling of Iceland is someting I love to promote to my clients.

The feeling of feeling like you are alone in the world.

The feeling of seeing uncountable beautiful waterfalls

The feeling of being cold and warm at the same time.

The feeling of having four seasons in one day (or at least, three).

The feeling of tasting something you are not quite sure what to think about.

The feeling of being in a place that is between north America and Europe and not entirely either.

The feeling of bathing in water that smells of sulfur.

The feeling of being able to drink clean water straight from the ground outside in nature or inside from your tap.

The feeling of having 24 hours of daylight, and energy that you haven´t felt before

The feeling of taking the country in slowly, to enjoy the extraordinary scenery on your path.

The feeling of having a cold drink in a hot tub, outside and seeing the Northern Lights dancing above your head.

The feeling of being put in your place where nature rules

That´s the feeling of Iceland.

It’s time to come visit.

 

Contact us to make an apointment to talk about the possibility of your dream coming true in Iceland.

The power of the geothermal dimension of the Iceland experience – By Mike Klein

While Iceland is best known for its volcanic landscape and it’s lively little capital of Reykjavik, the crown jewel of the Iceland experience is the “pot” – a place to bathe in warming geothermal waters, outdoors and 52 weeks a year.

No, not that kind of “pot” – I speak of the kind that produces steam, not smoke.

Now, Iceland’s most famous geothermal sites, the Blue Lagoon near the capital and the Mývatn Nature Baths in the country’s North, are far larger than the average pot, the pot brings that warming sensation to hundreds of hotels, summer houses, and community pools around the country.

Geothermal winter afternoon
Experiencing the sunset, in the snow in a warm geothermal pot with a glass of something sparkling, is an unforgettable experience. Photo by Helga Stína

Summer houses often offer private pots for the use of their guests, making them instantly attractive on a year-round basis to those seeking the chance to see the northern lights while partially submerged with a glass of wine in hand.

A pot transforms a country hotel from a mere place to stay to a place to relax, and potentially, to meet other guests and trade travel experience stories.

Iceland’s dozens of community swimming pools usually have several pots, offering a variety of temperatures and occasionally, some form of water massage.

Invariably, the water is geothermally heated, so the experience is as “green” as it is warm. In areas where geothermal water is available, the water comes in straight from the earth. Otherwise, it is heated by Iceland’s extensive supply of geothermally-fueled electricity.

Hotels with access to pots also vary widely in price. Depending on the part of the country one is visiting, a summer house with a pot can start in price from $200 or €170, per night. Hotels with access to pots also vary widely in price. Community pools offer admission for less than $12 or €10, and a ticket to the Blue Lagoon will run you about $70 or €58.

Geothermal area and steaming fumaroles, Iceland
The smell in the geothermal areas of Iceland is the smell of home… for some people at least – Photo by Helga Stina

Mike Klein is Principal of Changing The Terms, a Reykjavik-based business communication consultancy.  A US native, Mike has lived in Iceland since 2020 and has also resided in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK.  He is the former Europe – Middle East – Africa chair of IABC, a leading global communication association.  He is particularly fond of Icelandic cod and the Gull brand of Icelandic lager, and is married to Helga Stina, founder of Iceland Unwrapped.

To arrange your Iceland holiday this year, visit @Iceland Unwrapped at www.icelandunwrapped.com

Is the “stocked cabin” about to become Iceland tourism’s “next big thing” By Mike Klein

Tourism in Iceland has roared back from it’s Covid-era abyss. That means pressure on the country’s relatively tight accommodation supply is again an issue, particularly at the upper end of the accommodation spectrum.  But the ever-innovative Icelanders are putting their heads together to make better use of the country’s supply of holiday cabins or “summer-homes” for luxury-oriented travellers.

 

“Holiday cabins are a way of life for Icelanders,” says Helga Kristin (Helgastina) Fridjonsdottir of Iceland Unwrapped. “Many families own their own or rent them through informal local arrangements, through institutions like the unions they belong to, and, occasionally through AirBnB.”

Being in total relaxation for a couple of days in this environment is a treat of a lifetime – Photo by Helga Stina

“Many of the holiday cabins are fairly luxurious – nicely furnished, with full kitchens, capable of handling families or groups from two to twelve people.  Usually, they come with a water or mountain view. The kicker for many is an on-site hot-tub, often filled with local geothermally heated water.  Few things are better than to be sitting in a hot tub, with a cold drink in hand, taking advantage of the midnight sun or having an unforgettable night under the Northern Lights.”

Life at it’s calmest. Photo by Óskar and María

But holiday cabins are rarely sought as a lodging option by foreign visitors.  

To make holiday cabins more accessible and appealing, Iceland Unwrapped is doing two things: building a network of luxury holiday cabins in attractive parts of Iceland, and adding personalized itineraries to help guests make the most of the sites in a one-day return driving distance of their cabin. The hosts, in turn, would make available a package of groceries, beverages and prepared meals to those guests who want to eliminate the hassle and time involved in shopping in a new country.

Peace and quiet at a farm – Photo by Helga Stina

 

“The idea is that someone can fly into our airport, pick up their car, drive to their cabin, and go straight to the hot tub with their groceries and choice of beverage waiting in the fridge,” Helgastina explains.  “Iceland is fairly advanced when it comes to online grocery shopping and delivery, but the delivery zones tend to fall short of most holiday cabin locations. By literally going the extra mile, we create the most carefree, comfortable and customized Iceland experience possible.”

Geothermal energy is essential in Iceland for all kinds of purposes – Photo by Frida

In keeping with the country’s standard holiday cabin preferences, locations tend to be an easy 1-2 hour drive from the capital of Reykjavik, but options are available near northern hotspot Akureyri and other locations around Iceland’s coast.  Some are quite remote, others are within 30-45 minutes of small-town shopping and other amenities.

Photo by Helga Stina

For more information on stocked cabins – or to make your property available for rental on a non-exclusive basis, contact Iceland Unwrapped at helgastina@icelandunwrapped.com or via the website

Mike Klein is Principal of Changing The Terms, a Reykjavik-based business communication consultancy.  A US native, Mike has lived in Iceland since 2020 and has also resided in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK.  He is the former Europe – Middle East – Africa chair of IABC, a leading global communication association.  He is particularly fond of Icelandic cod and the Gull brand of Icelandic lager, and is married to Helga Stina, founder of Iceland Unwrapped.

Iceland is hot – Iceland is open “literally”

“Yes it’s pretty crazy. It smells like a big bonfire with some sulfur added to it. Very warm indeed, and so windy that the coffee blew from my coffee cup. A bit of a cough, but we are still alive. The hike was two hours up about three mountains”.

This is the conversation I had with a friend this week after hiking to one of the wonders of this world. The birth of new land on Iceland’s Reykjanes Peninsula.

Power of nature – Photo by Helga Stína

I went with my family last weekend to see the fiery glory. After a challenging hike uphill, the reward was something we all were truly thankful for being able to experience. A once in a lifetime show.  A volcano in full eruption in the beautiful nature of Iceland.

Love at first sight – Photo by Helga Stína

The sound of the the volcano was something we had never heard before. Truly remarkable to hear rocks melting and being thrown into the air as liquid.

The experience of the heat was surprisingly comfortable after a chilly walk upwards. Kind of like sitting by the fire in your own house if the scenery was a bit more extreme, if you know what I mean. Even  though were near it, it was too far to roast marshmallows.

The smell was powerful but not overpowering.

It crossed my mind that it would be interesting to know what we were inhaling.

Hiking by a lava river – Photo by Helga Stína

The crowd, mostly Icelanders apart from a few tourists, sometimes in their sneakers and leather jackets, was a mix of children down to one year olds, families, friend groups, extreme hikers and a few hardy senior citizens. The look on people’s faces and the amazement in their voices when seeing the volcano for the first time added extra enjoyment to the trip. It was a festive crew.

It´s starting to get real now. Covid has been hanging over our heads in the last one and a half year. Now finally we can see an end to this in some places of the world. And as for a miracle, Iceland starts to erupt, like by an order of the tourism board or something. Quite incredible.

Lava wall – Photo by Helga Stina

After the financial crisis in 2008, Iceland had a big eruption in 2010 when Eyjafjallajökull erupted, making air travel impossible for days. The Icelanders were not sure what would come out of that. But in the aftermath of that eruption, Iceland became a household name and Eyjafjallajökull glacier something everyone wanted to be able to pronounce, with often interesting results.

Hiking to see the glory – Photo by Helga Stína

Now Iceland is opening up for vaccinated tourists and for those who have had Covid before.

You won´t find the volcano in any guidebook nor will you find much that is current about the Iceland travel scene.

Piecing together a trip at this current moment isn´t as easy as it may look. If you want to make the most out of your trip to Iceland a personal travel planner has never been more valuable.

If you want to get the best from your time and money, and not miss memories and connections that will last a lifetime, involving a personal travel planner is a great choice.

That is what I do.

Helga Stína – Iceland Unwrapped

Please follow us on Facebook and Instagram

Lava up close – Photo by Helga Stína

Have a look at this amazing drone film from this magical eruption in Iceland. 

Iceland 2021 – Covid does not take the beauty away

It´s been a long time now. A long time since we have travelled the world.

Iceland, which has seen incredible increases in tourism since the financial crisis in 2008, is currently facing 10% unemployment because of collapse in the tourism business since the outbreak of Covid-19.

Icelanders have seen worse through the centuries though, with fishing stocks failing, multiple volcanic eruptions, and weather that is so unpredictable that you can sometimes only plan your day of activities on the spot.

Photo by Helga Stína
Photo by Helga Stina

So what is happening now in Iceland?

Iceland is semi open. It’s much more open than Western Europe, for example. There is no lock down in Iceland. Shops are open (with restrictions) as are restaurants, schools and cafés. There is a limit on how many people can gather: no more than 10 people can meet.

To name a few other things, we have had a beautiful volcanic eruption happening just some km outside the international airport area in a perfect spot. Not dangerous to people, unless they are trying to do something silly like bbq -ing in the lava. It’s now only a medium hard hike away from the nearest road, following some quick maintenance by the authorities.

Here is a live broadcast of the volcanic eruption

Meanwhile to make sure Iceland protects it´s daily life from Covid, the government has implemented new rules at the borders where travelers from high-risk “red” covid zones are obliged to stay at quarantine hotels directly after arrival for 5 days. This followed problems with visitors who refused to respect the mandatory but harder-to-enforce requirement to isolate on their own for five days, opting instead to visit supermarkets, ski resorts and volcanic eruptions and ultimately spreading infections. I hope we will soon have more vaccinated people traveling, and that the slow Icelandic vaccine roll out will pick up enough pace so this measure will not need to continue.

Photo by Helga Stína
Photo by Helga Stína

In the meantime, as my 13 year old said. “Covid can not take the beauty away”.

When you are up for travel again I recommend to use a personalized travel planner to explore possibilities to make sure everything you wish for is available and open. Iceland Unwrapped is actively visiting and researching to develop new itineraries which will be “ready to go” when the first vaccinated travelers come over this summer/autumn.

Keep dreaming and planning. This will all be a distant memory sooner than later I hope.

For more information on personalized travel plan in Iceland when you are ready to travel contact Iceland Unwrapped – www.icelandunwrapped.com

The beauty of Iceland is waiting for you.

More information on Covid in Iceland

Peaceful Iceland – and its appeal to the 2021 traveler

When people mention Iceland, the first things that generally come to mind are mountains, volcanos, geysers and breathtakingly stunning landscapes. 

Oh, they’re all included in the price of a plane ticket (assuming you can rent a car, a guide or take a tour that will get them to you). But, having lived in Iceland since July of 2020, I get a sense there’s another side of Iceland that will have some appeal to those willing to travel this spring and thereafter.

It’s peaceful.  

And by peaceful, I don’t necessarily mean “quiet”.  I mean, rather, that Iceland works and is more than ready to accommodate its next visitors.  

Rain and shine in Reykjavik – Photo by Helga Stina

 

While it will take some time for Iceland’s tourism industry to recover, the country is emerging from the worst of COVID-19 relative to other destinations.  

Never a big package-tourism place, Iceland has a great base of small hotels and rental properties (many optimistically called “summer houses”).

Being in total relaxation for a couple of days in this environment is a treat of a lifetime – Photo by Helga Stina

 

Many summer houses are secluded and have scenic views and built in hot tubs, some using Iceland’s famous geothermally heated water. Most have fully equipped kitchens. As seclusion in Iceland does not mean being completely cut off, Iceland’s well-supplied supermarkets are rarely more than a half an hour-hour drive away.  

 

Town life, and the comings and goings in Iceland’s university-town-sized capital of Reykjavik, has remained active throughout the pandemic – with restaurants and cinemas remaining open, and with the local geothermal spa/swimming pools fully operational in most towns across the country.

Iceland is perfect for picnic. Reykjavík autumn sun – Photo by helgastina

Reykjavik has an easy feel to it at the moment.  No crowds, plenty of dining choices, a selection of small museums and local sights.  A brief drive of 15-20 minutes outside the city or its suburbs situates you in sweeping seascapes, lunar landscapes, silent volcanos and steaming geothermal zones.  To make the most of your Reykjavik area experience, the services of local experts like Iceland Unwrapped are invaluable now because many sites and locations have closed or are changing hands as the recovery gathers pace.

The mercurial national currency, the Icelandic Krona, is also the most tourist-friendly it’s been in years, bringing prices down to levels comparable to larger cities in North America and Europe, excepting of course the nation’s pricey if diversely supplied chain of state liquor stores.

To be sure, you can come to Iceland and be blown away by the scenery.  But travelers seeking peace, quiet, comfort and space will be pleased by a trip to the Land of Fire and Ice.  2021 will be a good time to come.

Mike Klein is Principal of Changing The Terms, a Reykjavik-based business communication consultancy.  A US native, Mike has lived in Iceland since 2020 and has also resided in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK.  He is the former Europe – Middle East – Africa chair of IABC, a leading global communication association.  He is particularly fond of Icelandic cod and the Gull brand of Icelandic lager, and is married to Helga Stina, founder of Iceland Unwrapped.

Happy New Travel Year 2021

This has been a weird year to say the least.

Everything we have taken for granted has been put on hold: such as hugging each other or shaking hands, traveling or meeting up with all of our family and friends at once. Some places have been hit very hard and are still in the middle of this Covid hurricane.

Last month the first vaccines arrived in Iceland. The minister of health, a fine lady, was following the flight on radar to make sure everything would be as it should be and nothing would stop this important cargo to arrive safely to the shores of this rock in the north Atlantic.

There is a relief in Icelandic society now as we can see an end of this situation in sight and possibilities of getting life back to normal, whatever that normal will be.

At the moment health staff are vaccinating our most vulnerable, along people in nursing homes and health personnel, the heroes of 2020 without a doubt.

But what will 2021 look like? 

The travel industry in Iceland and around the world has shrunk, collapsed or been put on hold.

Will we be able to recover from this? I am sure we will. But it will take time,

I also know that people have kept on dreaming about travel and destinations because dreaming is important when you are in the middle of a pandemic. Dreams that might come true in the New Year or in the year after that.

Iceland has been a popular destination and will likely see something of a travel revival. Here are 4 main reasons:

1. Space. People need to get used to the idea of being around other people again and will want uncrowded destinations with space for social distancing. Iceland becomes a strong choice because of its low population density and abundance of open space. All 360.000 of us live in a space the size of the US state of Ohio, twice the size of Denmark and nearly two and half times the size of the Netherlands

2. Hospitality. The Icelanders are aware of the importance of receiving guests with respect and the uniqueness of a small society. That is why all around Iceland you can find entrepreneurs who have built up wonderful businesses with their heart, soul, and bare hands to be able to show the best of Iceland’s nature, culture and gastronomy. You can even visit people in their homes for dinner or a home concert. The diversity in accommodation is also important – you can find any type of accommodation on the island, from a farmer’s guesthouse with animals in sight to a fancy hotel in one of the towns.

3. Diversity. There are few places on earth that offer the diversity in landscape as Iceland does. The land of fire and ice offers geothermal pools that are open all year round, waterfalls, glaciers and lava formations that will make the imagination go crazy. Ocean all around, rivers and creeks with pure water to drink on your hikes. The midnight sun in June and the Aurora Borealis in winter are experiences everyone should have at least once in their lives.

4. Distance management. I always recommend my clients to take it easy even as they take their extraordinary excursions in Iceland. Feeling the culture, nature, fresh air and the purest water imaginable is a part of the experience. And to be able to do that you need to know how to do it. Distance is a big part of planning your trip in Iceland. That is why working with locals is essential to make the most of visitors’ time and money.

Keep dreaming. Iceland will be waiting when you are ready. It will be wonderful to receive you in the coming months – or the coming years.

Wishing you and your loved ones a happy new year 2021.

Helga Stína – Founder and owner of Iceland Unwrapped by helgastina

Iceland and Eurovision – A decades long love story

Oh well. My home country Iceland continues to amaze me and perhaps it is quite extraordinary how it somehow manages to stay in the discussion as one of the most important places to visit in the world.

In the past months we have been experiencing an extraordinary world. The world came to a stop and traveling was something that was not on peoples minds for the foreseeable future.

But the world has been helpful. In the past weeks there has been amazing publicity about Iceland in various media. This and the fact that Iceland has been successful in managing the virus, is making people opening up for the idea of visiting this rock in the North Atlantic during the Covid-19 pandemic.

A movie by Will Ferrell has been rocking the world in the past weeks. It is about the Eurovision Song Contest and how the Icelanders are obsessed with it. And they truly are, not only in the film.

When I was growing up Eurovision was one of the highlights of the year.

In the times of no TV on Thursdays and no TV for five weeks in the summer there were a couple of golden moments in front of the screen. Eurovision was one of them.

I remember those Eurovision evenings, when we only had one Saturday evening of Eurovision (now there are three). Good dinner, family gathered together, having an opinion on who should win. Amazing hairdos in the 80´s, Plastic Bertrand, Johnny Logan, Celine Dion, and my personal favorite, the Herrey’s singing about their golden shoes. Truly adorable.

One of the shocks of the century was that the Italians wouldn´t win with Gente di mare in 1987 and believe me, the shocks have been many due to the fact that somehow politics between countries has had an impact on the results, where former enemies would put their swords away and vote for each other, or not.

In recent years there have been some amazing songs, in my opinion, like the Portuguese winner. No doubt, this competition brings people together in the harmony of friendship and unity and can have a big impact on the artists involved.

When Iceland started to compete in 1986 we were all sure about that we would of course win. The devastation and shock was almost unbearable when the results were clear. Our song – Gleðibankinn (The Joy bank) ended up in the 16th place. The impact on the Icelanders’ identity will never fully be known and perhaps never to be fully recovered from.

Nevertheless the Icelanders never stop believing in winning and we have been the runner up twice, which was of course unbearable to live through, although no one really knows where to host this big event in Iceland if that would happen 🙂

This year was our year, but this damn virus prevented that from happening with this amazing song. We will probably never recover from that shock.

Eurovision is very integrated into the Icelandic soul. Originally I think it was because of our curiosity about the world around us which seemed far away and out of reach. So this one evening we could be a part of a bigger unit, united with our cool friends and role models in Europe.

Secondly I think it is because we are a small nation of 360.00 people that wants to be a player on the big scene and believes in the power of the small over the big. Kind of like in the old folklore where a small human would conquer over a troll, tricking it to stay out in daylight and turning into stone.

For more information on personalized travel planning including Eurovision or not on www.icelandunwrapped.com

Peaceful Iceland

Why Iceland is perfect for the social distancing vacation – By Helga Stina

I have been working for and with fantastic people for many years now who all have had in common the dream to visit my home country of Iceland.

Photo by Helga Stina

People are different and have different needs. Some people love exploring cities, street art, restaurants, cafés, museums, and watching the locals in their daily routines.

It may still be unfeasible to do a normal city vacation these days. But our small but lively capital, Reykjavik, has urban amenities that are open and accessible. Restaurants and cafes are open, museums and thermal pools are back in business as well. And the city is easily accommodating the continuing need for social distancing.

Photo by Helga Stina

Of course, Iceland has a lot more to offer than a comfortable socially distanced city break.

Indeed, that´s why I often guide people to go straight to nature upon arrival in Iceland. Arriving in Iceland in the middle of the lava field where the airport is located is an amazing experience in itself. But going straight to your first destination with fantastic views and peace is unforgettable, especially when you already know where you are going and have a nice idea of what awaits at the first accommodation.

Photo by Helga Stina

Even though Iceland is now accessible, preparation for an Iceland trip is all the more critical now than before. Socially distant accommodation that gives people get the space and peace they need is plentiful. Such accommodation can range from spacious chain hotels to private villas to summerhouses to boutique hotels. But the right accommodation is not always easy to find. Beyond Reykjavik, dining and catering options need to be identified in advance of arrival.

Once that´s handled, there will be vast spaces available for sightseeing and exploration, and even the most popular spots will have significantly more space than previous years. People in the tourism industry are focused on making the most of it during this unique situation, and offering additional experiences to add to the Iceland Adventure.

Photo by Helga Stina

Every season has it´s charm in Iceland, depending on your wishes. Midsummer sun, northern lights, snow activities, autumn colors or refreshing spring are all great options to explore this amazing place.

Summer is the most traditional tourist season, and this year´s version will have the bonus of having the best travel conditions of the year, combined with the least crowded tourist population in recent memory.

Photo by Helga Stina

More on personalized travel planning here

More on Iceland opening up for tourists on the 15th of June

Contact me for an informal chat about your Iceland dream. If you are traveling in 2020 or 2021 or even 2022 it is a joy to start exploring and planning.

Here is a bit more on the looking forward to.

Greetings

Helga Stína – Founder and owner of Iceland Unwrapped and Places Unwrapped

Photos by Helga Stina

We are also on FacebookInstagram and Twitter