Hiking, collecting the sheep, berry picking and the wonderful Kjotsupa.

A few reasons why September is a good month to travel to Iceland.

So let´s imagine a day.

You are hiking in the mountains with the farmers in a little fjord helping with collecting the sheep.

On your path you taste fresh blue berries straight from the bush.

You get a drink of water from a creek after a long day of hiking in your Icelandic wool sweater.

At the end of the work day you have a wonderful “Kjotsupa” – meat soup, with the locals followed by the dairy product Skyr and blueberries for dessert.

After dinner you lay down in a beautiful warm geothermal pool, with a view of a lifetime hoping to see the Northern lights dancing in the sky.

Sounds like a dream to me.

The fact of the matter is, that this is possible. All of it or parts of it.

This is possible in Iceland at the end of august and in the beginning of September.

Autumn in Iceland is beautiful in so many ways and it´s very precious to be a part of nature when summer is almost over.

The sunsets are unbelievable and one of the biggest events of the year takes place, when the sheep get collected from the mountains before winter starts.

In the old days and to a certain extend in modern times, the autumn is the time of collecting as much food as possible for the hard winter months in Iceland.

Berries are used for all kinds of delicacies, mushrooms are collected and dried, fish is caught from the rivers, potatoes, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables, that manage to grow in Iceland, are picked from the ground and we make something called Kjotsupa.

It´s a celebration of food.

Kjötsúpa is a wonderful dish. Lamb soup with vegetables of the autumn, warm and delicious on wet autumn nights. Some people even have Kjotsupa for every meal in the autumn they say.

Fresh – authentic and delicious Iceland.

Interested in getting an authentic experience?

Contact Helga Stina for more information

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